The Hungarian Sisters (18th Century) By Justus Chevillet

Ilona and Judit Gófitz, Siamese twins known as The Hungarian Sisters. They lived from 1701 to 1723. Also known as Hélène and Judith.

The Hungarian Sisters (18th Century) By Justus Chevillet

After seeing them in London, Alexander the Pope wrote a poem about the sisters:

“Two sisters wonderful to behold, who have thus grown as one,
That naught their bodies can divide, no power beneath the sun.
The town of Szoenii gave them birth, hard by far-famed Komorn,
Which noble fort may all the arts of Turkish sultans scorn.
Lucina, woman’s gentle friend, did Helen first receive;
And Judith, when three hours had passed, her mother’s womb did leave.

One urine passage serves for both; one anus, so they tell;
The other parts their numbers keep, and serve their owners well.
Their parents poor did send them forth, the world to travel through,
That this great wonder of the age should not be hid from view.
The inner parts concealed do lie hid from our eyes, alas!
But all the body here you view erect in solid brass.”

Image Credit: The Wellcome Collection by the Wellcome Library, London. Copyrighted under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0. Information source Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopedia, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Mentally Ill Patients (1834) By Wilhelm von Kaulbach

“Mentally ill patients in the garden of an asylum, a warden lurks in the background.” – Image description.

Mentally Ill Patients (1834) By Wilhelm von Kaulbach

Mentally ill patients in the garden of an asylum, a warden lurks in the background. Engraving by K.H. Merz under the direction of S. Amsler, c. 1834, after W. Kaulbach. Credit: Wellcome CollectionCC BY

Distilling Eyewater (19th Century) By Thomas Rowlandson

A medical practitioner uses her own urine to create a medicine which she offers for sale for rubbing on the eyes to dispel bad ‘humours’. She has a younger women and cat contribute to the medicines as well.

Distilling Eyewater (19th Century) By Thomas Rowlandson

Credit: Image source. The Wellcome Collection by the Wellcome Library, London. Copyrighted under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0

Perseus and Andromeda (1891) By Frederic Leighton

Andromeda was chained to a rock at the edge of the sea as an offering to a sea monster. Perseus rescued her. They fell in love and wed. There are more details, but that is a simple summary. Read more at Wikipedia.

Perseus and Andromeda (1891) By Frederic Leighton

Image source, no known copyright restrictions. Information source Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopedia, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Oedipus and the Sphinx (1864) By Gustave Moreau

Oedipus and the Sphinx (1864) By Gustave Moreau

“The painting depicts Oedipus meeting the Sphinx at the crossroads on his journey between Thebes and Delphi. Oedipus must answer the Sphinx’s riddle correctly in order to pass. Failure means his own death and that of the besieged Thebans. The riddle was: “What walks on four feet in the morning, two in the afternoon and three at night?”. Oedipus answered: “Man: as an infant, he crawls on all fours; as an adult, he walks on two legs and; in old age, he uses a walking stick”. Oedipus was the first to answer the riddle correctly and, having heard Oedipus’ answer, the Sphinx was astounded and inexplicably killed herself by throwing herself into the sea. Oedipus thereby won the freedom of the Thebans, the kingdom of that city and a wife Jocasta, who it was later revealed was his mother.” – Oedipus and the Sphinx on Wikipedia

Image source, has no known copyright restrictions. Information source Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopedia, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Cult of Cybele Castration Clamp

“The goddess Cybele was a great mother goddess adopted by Rome from Asia Minor. Her worship, like Isis, was popular amongst women. The worship of Cybele had emotional appeal, offering salvation and priests of the goddess castrated themselves in her service. A bronze castration clamp found in the Thames at London Bridge, is believed to have been used in the cult of Cybele. The clamp is decorated with busts of Cybele and her lover Attis while busts of other Roman deities represent the days of the week.” – Description.

The year 1948 is put on this image. However, it is not clear of which date it pertains too – Creation of Clamp, Discovery of Clamp, or Photograph.

Cult of Cybele Castration Clamp

Image source. No known copyright restrictions.

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