Perseus and Andromeda (1891) By Frederic Leighton

Andromeda was chained to a rock at the edge of the sea as an offering to a sea monster. Perseus rescued her. They fell in love and wed. There are more details, but that is a simple summary. Read more at Wikipedia.

Perseus and Andromeda (1891) By Frederic Leighton

Image source, no known copyright restrictions. Information source Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopedia, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Oedipus and the Sphinx (1864) By Gustave Moreau

Oedipus and the Sphinx (1864) By Gustave Moreau

“The painting depicts Oedipus meeting the Sphinx at the crossroads on his journey between Thebes and Delphi. Oedipus must answer the Sphinx’s riddle correctly in order to pass. Failure means his own death and that of the besieged Thebans. The riddle was: “What walks on four feet in the morning, two in the afternoon and three at night?”. Oedipus answered: “Man: as an infant, he crawls on all fours; as an adult, he walks on two legs and; in old age, he uses a walking stick”. Oedipus was the first to answer the riddle correctly and, having heard Oedipus’ answer, the Sphinx was astounded and inexplicably killed herself by throwing herself into the sea. Oedipus thereby won the freedom of the Thebans, the kingdom of that city and a wife Jocasta, who it was later revealed was his mother.” – Oedipus and the Sphinx on Wikipedia

Image source, has no known copyright restrictions. Information source Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopedia, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Cult of Cybele Castration Clamp

“The goddess Cybele was a great mother goddess adopted by Rome from Asia Minor. Her worship, like Isis, was popular amongst women. The worship of Cybele had emotional appeal, offering salvation and priests of the goddess castrated themselves in her service. A bronze castration clamp found in the Thames at London Bridge, is believed to have been used in the cult of Cybele. The clamp is decorated with busts of Cybele and her lover Attis while busts of other Roman deities represent the days of the week.” – Description.

The year 1948 is put on this image. However, it is not clear of which date it pertains too – Creation of Clamp, Discovery of Clamp, or Photograph.

Cult of Cybele Castration Clamp

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The Evil Flowers (1900) By Carlos Schwabe

These are illustrations for the book “Les Fleurs du Mal”, or in English “The Flowers of Evil”. It contains poems by Charles Baudelaire.

I was able to find a translated copy of Baudlaire’s works. “Poems of Baudelaire” by Roy Campbell – Free to read online and download.

The Blessing

The Evil Flowers - Blessing (1900) By Carlos Schwabe
Image source.

The Barrel

The Evil Flowers - Barrel (1900) By Carlos Schwabe
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Anthem

The Evil Flowers - Anthem (1900) By Carlos Schwabe
Image source.

Deadly

The Evil Flowers - Deadly (1900) By Carlos Schwabe
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Revolt

The Evil Flowers- Revolt (1900) By Carlos Schwabe
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No known copyright restrictions for any of the images.

Obese Man (18th Century) By John Hamilton Mortimer

“A grossly obese man supporting his stomach in a wheelbarrow, a young fop looks on.” – Description.

Some days I wake up and feel like I need a wheelbarrow for my fat. #relatable

Obese Man (18th Century) By John Hamilton Mortimer

Credit: Image source. The Wellcome Collection by the Wellcome Library, London. Copyrighted under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0

Marcus Regulus (1560) By Guilio Romano

Marcus Atilius Regulus being placed in a barrel lined with iron spikes. Soldiers are fitting more nails on the barrel and closing the lid. Marcus was a Roman statesman and general, around 250 BC.

He did not fulfill his promises to the people.

Marcus Regulus (1560) By Guilio Romano

Image source. Credit to the Wellcome Collection by the Wellcome Library, London. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution CC BY 4.0. Also, the Information source is Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopedia, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Fiery Furnace (1494) By Master of the Lubeck Bible

It depicts a story in chapter 3 of the Book of Daniel. Three Hebrew men are thrown into a fiery furnace. However, they not only walk out unscathed – they are accompanied by Jesus! Read more about this on Wikipedia.

Is it me or do the ‘flames’ look like red snakes?๐Ÿ

Fiery Furnace (1494) By Master of the Lubeck Bible

Image source, no known copyright restrictions. Information source Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopedia, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

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