Danse Macabre Music Pieces

The concept is that no matter one’s station in life, the Dance Macabre unities all. The personification of death shall dance with the departed on the deceased’s way to the grave.

This is the music Death will dance too.

Dance of the Dead (1838) by Franz Liszt

Also called ‘Totentanz’. This is a symphonic piece based on the melody ‘Dies Irae'(Below).


Source. This is a recording of ‘Dance of the Dead’ by Neal O’Doan . Under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Dies Irae (13th Century) by Thomas of Celano or Malabranca Orsini

Audio source. No known copyright restrictions.


For full lyrics, check out the Dies Irae’s Wikipedia page.

Cadaver Monument (1446) Photo by Vassil

Also called ‘Transi de Guillaume LeFranchois’. Transi means ‘Cadaver Monument’. Guillaume LeFranchois is the deceased person featured in the effigy. Carved out of black stone.

Thanks to Vassil for dedicating these photographs in the Public Domain, see Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication license for more information.

Cadaver Monument (1446) Photo by Vassil
Close up of Head. Source
Cadaver Monument (1446) Photo by Vassil
Source
Cadaver Monument (1446) Photo by Vassil
Full Picture. Source

Information source Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopedia, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Dance of the Dead (16th Century) by Wihelm Werner

Images, 41 in total, from a book written somewhere between 1540 to 1550. Original text is in German, and I was unable to find a translation.

The title for this book is ‘Zimmerische Totentanz’. ‘Zimmerische’ is most likely a reference to the author. ‘Totentanz’ means ‘Dance of the Dead’.

Continue reading Dance of the Dead (16th Century) by Wihelm Werner

Hypochondriac (1788) By Thomas Rowlandson

A hypochondriac surrounded by doleful specters. The doctor can’t help those threatened by their own mind. Mental Health treatment was not available then.

Hypochondriac (1788) By Thomas Rowlandson

A hypochondriac surrounded by doleful spectres. Coloured etc
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk. By T. Rowlandson after J. Dunthorne, 1788.

Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0